E-learning and Digital Cultures, Week 2: Perspectives on Education #edcmooc

I finally caught up on two of the education-centred readings for week 2 of the massive MOOC, “E-learning and Digital Cultures”.

Shirky, C. (2012). Napster, Udacity and the academy. shirky.com, 12 November 2012. http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2012/11/napster-udacity-and-the-academy/

I admit to not always being the most successful critical thinker – I tend to want to believe the things I . . . → Read More: E-learning and Digital Cultures, Week 2: Perspectives on Education #edcmooc

Week 2: E-learning and Digital Cultures #edcmooc

I’m currently attending this MOOC: E-learning and Digital Cultures, offered through Coursera.

Activity for Week 2

Themes explored this week included technological utopianism and dystopianism, and the idea of technological determinism.

I watched these videos:

Video: “Day Made of Glass 2″ (Corning)

The “Glass as lifestyle” approach is somewhat corporate wishful thinking, IMHO, and . . . → Read More: Week 2: E-learning and Digital Cultures #edcmooc

Week 1: E-learning and Digital Cultures #edcmooc

I’m currently attending this MOOC: E-learning and Digital Cultures, offered through Coursera.

Activity for Week 1

Themes explored this week included technological utopianism and dystopianism, and the idea of technological determinism.

I watched these videos:

This animation showed symbolically how cultures elevate and then scrap technologies, hoisting them to a high level of dominance, . . . → Read More: Week 1: E-learning and Digital Cultures #edcmooc

Improving hardware and software usability, but for whom?

Last year, I read an astute saying that said “If you didn’t pay to use a service, then you are the product being sold”. I feel like that kind of “buyer beware” maxim could be applied to ease-of-use in information technologies too. Here’s what I mean…

If a technology tool or platform is popular, we . . . → Read More: Improving hardware and software usability, but for whom?

Sonic Soul and Electric Blues: Listening a little closer to Jimi Hendrix

Every few years, I go through a “music phase”, where I feel inspired to pick up my acoustic and learn a new chord or two, or try to learn a tune on our little Casio keyboard. It feels good to explore a different kind of expression, even as a periodic novice.

Inspiration can come from . . . → Read More: Sonic Soul and Electric Blues: Listening a little closer to Jimi Hendrix

Gallery-2557: Personal Drawing and Collage

Here’s a link to a new gallery on this site – a collection of personal drawings or collages that I’ve done since 1998.

If I draw, it can be immediate, messy and expressive, like the manic scribbles of an angry child. That feels good.

However, collage from found commercial images is my favourite method. I . . . → Read More: Gallery-2557: Personal Drawing and Collage

The weight of a Dragon; the position of a Rock.

Today, I enjoyed a visit and stimulating discussion with one of my earliest art school teachers, John Wertschek, currently an Associate Professor at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver.

I suppose that many of John’s former Foundation students would probably agree that he has, in one way or another, challenged them . . . → Read More: The weight of a Dragon; the position of a Rock.

Learning, without end…

I get glimpses of learning happening all around me. Sometimes I’m part of the process, tutoring, advising or coaching someone through a new concept. Sometimes I’m just observing how others teach and learn, or taking an opportunity to observe the communities that educators create in order to make learning happen for others.

Tutoring Grownups

In . . . → Read More: Learning, without end…

Pause for Reflection…

A personal inventory…

I am…

Used to learning face-first, by experience.

Sometimes outgoing, and sometimes withdrawn.

Happiest when I have a project on the go (whatever it is).

Grateful to learn from others.

Grateful to share knowledge and experience with others.

 

On Self-Learning: Why I Like it

I find it difficult to contemplate learning in a group, or in a classroom.

I don’t know where this reaction comes from, but I can say without hesitation that I’ve always treasured the time I spend reading on my own, and pondering new ideas.

Why do I enjoy self-learning?

I think that deep inside, I’m . . . → Read More: On Self-Learning: Why I Like it