On Research: How did it ever get done before the Internet?

How the hell did writers ever do research in the days before the Internet? A lot of cultural and technological development took place to get us where we are today.

I’m not exactly a digital native – I remember the days before Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google. I remember the days before the web, and . . . → Read More: On Research: How did it ever get done before the Internet?

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From Rockstars to Sleuths: Has 3D Game Storytelling Matured?

Have gaming and interactive storytelling finally matured to a new level? This is the impression I’m left with after reading reviews and watching clips from Rockstar/Team Bondi’s impressive new game, “L.A. Noire”.

Granted, I’m no gamer. Hell, I’m practically a neophyte. In the last year, I’ve probably spent more time playing Bejewelled and Angry Birds . . . → Read More: From Rockstars to Sleuths: Has 3D Game Storytelling Matured?

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Game Noir? “LA Noire” and Raymond Chandler’s Los Angeles

Check out these posts by Tom Williams, a literary agent and biographer of hard-boiled crime fiction master, Raymond Chandler.

Tom is reviewing the new Rockstar game, “LA Noire”:

LA Noire and Raymond Chandler (Part 1)

LA Noire and The Big Sleep

 

LA Noire and Raymond Chandler (Part 1) . . . → Read More: Game Noir? “LA Noire” and Raymond Chandler’s Los Angeles

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On Reading: Raymond Chandler, a Biography

It seems like the last few times I’ve read certain authors, their names have become prefixed with “Uncle” in my mind. Is that weird? Well, maybe. It’s human though.

I guess I want to identify with, or feel connected to good storytellers.

When I read Einstein’s book on Relativity, his voice was so distinctively heard . . . → Read More: On Reading: Raymond Chandler, a Biography

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The Monument for East Vancouver

Ken Lum’s public art piece, “Monument for East Vancouver” transforms an ad-hoc symbol of regional pride (or defiance, membership or territorial claim) into a new landmark on the city’s skyline. This piece is controversial… Some people love it, and some people hate it. . . . → Read More: The Monument for East Vancouver

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On Writing: John Steinbeck, the Grapes of Wrath, and my Dad’s Stories.

My Dad was born in 1921, and as a young kid, knowing that he grew up during the Great Depression had always fascinated me. During the Great Depression, times were tough for Dad’s family, I’m sure, but I would learn in Social Studies class that other families had it much worse during that time, particularly farmers, and especially in the United States. That is the setting of Steinbeck’s major novel, “The Grapes of Wrath”. . . . → Read More: On Writing: John Steinbeck, the Grapes of Wrath, and my Dad’s Stories.

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Visual artist Sonny Assu fuses native symbols with pop culture

Visual artist Sonny Assu fuses native symbols with pop culture, and reminds us that native culture isn’t dead, or dying, or just about preserving the past: it’s alive and interacting with us every day. . . . → Read More: Visual artist Sonny Assu fuses native symbols with pop culture

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Life: Connecting the dots between my Parents and Groucho…

This post from my personal blog connects the dots between my folks and Mr. Groucho Marx, who’s image and sayings were part of my parent’s vocabulary, and now, my own. . . . → Read More: Life: Connecting the dots between my Parents and Groucho…

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Real ink on paper? Where’s it going?

In my life, I wonder if ink on paper is slipping away from me, just a little bit. There’s something reassuring about a newspaper: you know what it is, it’s size and shape and depth are self-evident.

Yet, I now receive much more info each day on my Pre than I could ever read (or . . . → Read More: Real ink on paper? Where’s it going?

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Is Fiction a “Do Over” of Real Life?

Since 2002, I’ve been writing fiction (well, trying to write fiction), and over the past six and a half years, I’ve cobbled together a fairly extensive cast of fictional characters, all inhabiting a world that has numerous similarities to my own – but better.

Surprise, surprise.

In my first book, titled Owe Nothing, my main . . . → Read More: Is Fiction a “Do Over” of Real Life?

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